This female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire calculator evaluates and monitors woman sexual functioning as well as the level of dysfunction. Below the form you can read more about the six domains analyzed and the score interpretation.


1

Over the past 4 weeks, how often did you feel sexual desire or interest?

2

Over the past 4 weeks, how would you rate your level (degree) of sexual desire or interest?

3

Over the past 4 weeks, how often did you feel sexually aroused ("turned on") during sexual activity or intercourse?

4

Over the past 4 weeks, how would you rate your level of sexual arousal ("turn on") during sexual activity or intercourse?

5

Over the past 4 weeks, how confident were you about becoming sexually aroused during sexual activity or intercourse?

6

Over the past 4 weeks, how often have you been satisfied with your arousal (excitement) during sexual activity or intercourse?

7

Over the past 4 weeks, how often did you become lubricated ("wet") during sexual activity or intercourse?

8

Over the past 4 weeks, how difficult was it to become lubricated ("wet") during sexual activity or intercourse?

9

Over the past 4 weeks, how often did you maintain your lubrication ("wetness") until completion of sexual activity or intercourse?

10

Over the past 4 weeks, how difficult was it to maintain your lubrication ("wetness") until completion of sexual activity or intercourse?

11

Over the past 4 weeks, when you had sexual stimulation or intercourse, how often did you reach orgasm (climax)?

12

Over the past 4 weeks, when you had sexual stimulation or intercourse, how difficult was it for you to reach orgasm (climax)?

13

Over the past 4 weeks, how satisfied were you with your ability to reach orgasm (climax) during sexual activity or intercourse?

14

Over the past 4 weeks, how satisfied have you been with the amount of emotional closeness during sexual activity between you and your partner?

15

Over the past 4 weeks, how satisfied have you been with your sexual relationship with your partner?

16

Over the past 4 weeks, how satisfied have you been with your overall sexual life?

17

Over the past 4 weeks, how often did you experience discomfort or pain during vaginal penetration?

18

Over the past 4 weeks, how often did you experience discomfort or pain following vaginal penetration?

19

Over the past 4 weeks, how would you rate your level (degree) of discomfort or pain during or following vaginal penetration?

How does the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire calculator work?

This is a health tool determining the level of sexual dysfunction in females and is based on the original study that has been published in the Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy.

The FSFI comprises of a 19 item questionnaire focused on sexual functioning. There are six domains assessed. The subject is advised to consider each of the questions in the context of the last 4 weeks.

The six domains belonging to the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire calculator are defined in the following lines.

Desire – items 1 and 2; implying the wish/ wanting to engage in a sexual experience, receptivity towards sexual initiation or reacting to that as well as fantasizing.

Arousal – items 3, 4, 5 and 6; signs of attention, activity and excitement. Specifically the questionnaire looks at levels and types of arousal.

Lubrication – items 7, 8, 9 and 10; refers to vaginal lubrication that occurs during sexual excitement, presence, quantity or absence of it.

Orgasm – items 11, 12 and 13; ability to attain orgasms, factors impairing it.

Satisfaction – items 14, 15 and 16; level of happiness, content with actual sexual life and habits.

Pain – items 17, 18 and 19; discomfort sensations during intercourse.

Other definitions that might be found useful in the analysis of the question relevance include:

Sexual activity includes caressing, foreplay, masturbation and vaginal intercourse.

Sexual stimulation suggests intercourse or self stimulation.

Sexual intercourse represents the penile penetration of the vagina.

As a note, the FSFI does not substitute diagnostic instruments and cannot be used as sexual history questionnaire in clinical evaluations, like those for STD indentification.

The subsequent validation study focused on two different groups that also included female patients with various degrees of sexual arousal disorder (FSAD), female orgasmic disorder (FOD) and hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD).

Sensitivity and reliability measures are still to be entirely proved in clinical settings but the prospects are for this questionnaire to be used in treatment monitoring and the evaluation of outcomes.

Score interpretation

There are 6 domain scores belonging to the FSFI and that are summed to obtain the overall score. The rule of thumb for the overall result is that scores equal to or below 26.55 are classed as indicating female sexual dysfunction (FSD).

The domain scores are derived from the multiplication of the sum of domain items points and the domain factor. By adding the six domains, the final result can be obtained.

Usually, for domains in which the score is zero, this is indicative of the subject having reported there was no sexual activity during the past 4 weeks.

The following table exemplifies the 6 domains, the corresponding items and their score range, as well as the weight factor.

Domain Items Score range Factor Min score Max score
Desire 1, 2 1 - 5 0.6 1.2 6
Arousal 3, 4, 5, 6 0 - 5 0.3 0 6
Lubrication 7, 8, 9, 10 0 - 5 0.3 0 6
Orgasm 11, 12, 13 0 - 5 0.4 0 6
Satisfaction 14, 15, 16 0/1 - 5 0.4 0.8 6
Pain 17, 18, 19 0 - 5 0.4 0 6
Scale range       2 36

Female sexual dysfunction

FSAD also known as the Candace syndrome, is represented by the persistent, recurrent inability to attain arousal or to maintain it during intercourse. These problems may concern the sexual response, desire, pain occurrence or distress.

Loss of desire or lack of drive affects women in stress periods or during pregnancy due to psychological causes or physical illness such as hormonal disorders, diabetes or even due to chronic tiredness.

Orgasm problems are primary or secondary, the former concerning women who can’t and could not ever attain it while the latter analyses women who did experience orgasm in the past but at the moment don’t anymore. This might be due to lack of proper stimulation, psychological issues, mood disorders etc.

Dyspareunia represents pain during intercourse, due to low estrogen levels or dryness of the vagina or the spasm of the vaginal muscles. This reaction can be caused by a series of factors, personal beliefs, fear of pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases.

Medical professionals offer help to establish the causes of female dysfunction, often using questionnaires like the one above and in some cases, further counseling is recommended or even hormone therapy if this is the case.

References

1) Rosen R, Brown C. et al. (2000) The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI): a multidimensional self-report instrument for the assessment of female sexual function. J Sex Marital Ther; 26(2):191-208.

2) Cindy M. Meston (2003) Validation of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) in Women with Female Orgasmic Disorder and in Women with Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder. J Sex Marital Ther; 29(1): 39–46.

15 Jan, 2016 | 0 comments

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