This pediatric vital signs calculator lists the vital signs in the case of pediatric patients from heart rate to blood pressure, all depending on age. Below the form there is in depth information on the data presented, the source and what it represents.

Age:*

How does this pediatric vital signs calculator work?

This health tool provides the normal range for pediatric vital signs based on the input age. The calculator addresses to patients from neonate to 15 years old.

Pediatric vital signs can be defined as the functional parameters of the body in pediatric patients:

Heart rate – taken both when awake and asleep, with results of slight variation. Offers information on heart contractions and blood circulation.

■ Respiratory rate – recommended to be counted for a full 60s in the case of infants. Offers basic information on the respiratory function and degree of ventilation. For example, bradycardia in children is usually a sign of hypoxia.

Blood pressure – taken both the systolic and diastolic with the help of a manual sphygmomanometer and stethoscope. High pressure in children carries a greater risk than in the case of adults.

■ Temperature – taken in order to rule out or diagnose fever or to establish baseline for monitoring. It doesn’t differ with age but with method:

- Rectal: 36.6 - 38°C;

- Ear: 35.8 - 38°C;

- Oral & Axillary: 36.5 - 37.5°C

Monitoring vital signs is essential in showing patient progress. The following table contains the pediatric normal vital signs, that change with age, updated according to the PALS 2015 guidelines:

Age Heart rate (awake) bpm Heart rate (asleep) bpm Respiratory rate bpm Systolic BP mmHg Diastolic BP mmHg
Neonate (<1kg) 100 - 205 90 - 160 30 - 53 39 - 59 16 - 36
Neonate (3 kg) 100 - 205 90 - 160 30 - 53 60 - 84 31 - 53
Infant (1 - 12 months) 100 - 190 90 - 160 30 - 53 72 - 104 37 - 56
1 - 2 years 98 - 140 80 - 120 22 - 37 86 - 106 42 - 63
3 - 5 years 80 - 120 65 - 100 20 - 28 89 - 112 46 - 72
6 - 9 years 75 - 118 58 - 90 18 - 25 97 - 115 57 - 76
10 - 11 years 75 - 118 58 - 90 18 - 25 102 - 120 61 - 80
12 - 15 years 60 - 100 50 - 90 12 - 20 110 - 131 64 - 83

In certain health settings, pediatric pulse oximetry SPO2 is also monitored, however, this is not considered as an established vital sign.

The assessment of pediatric vital signs is often included in emergency room scorings such as the Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS).

References

1) Fleming S, Thompson M, Stevens R, Heneghan C, Plüddemann A, Maconochie I, Tarassenko L, Mant D. (2011) Normal ranges of heart rate and respiratory rate in children from birth to 18 years of age: a systematic review of observational studies. Lancet; 377(9770):1011-8.

2) Hewes H, Hunsaker S, Christensen M, Whitney J, Dalrymple T, Taillac P. (2016) Documentation of pediatric vital signs by EMS providers over time. J Pediatr Surg; 51(2):329-32.

3) Gausche M, Henderson DP, Seidel JS. (1990) Vital signs as part of the prehospital assessment of the pediatric patient: a survey of paramedics. Ann Emerg Med; 19(2):173-8.

4) Leduc D, Woods S. (2000) Temperature measurement in paediatrics. Canadian Paediatrics Society Position Statement.

5) Kleinman ME, Chameides L, Schexnayder SM et al. (2010) Pediatric advanced life support: 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Pediatrics; 126(5):e1361-99.

20 Sep, 2016 | 0 comments

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