This Roman Arabic numerals converter allows you to exchange Arabic to Roman numerals for your work and other uses. There is in depth information on this subject below the form.


Enter the Arabic or Roman number:*

How does this Roman Arabic numerals converter work?

Just enter a number between 1 and 4999 (the reason why the conversion is possible only up to 4999 is because numbers higher than this are formed by placing a dash over the symbol, that means "times 1,000" and this cannot be represented in ASCII format).

Example result: if you input 1256 within this Roman Arabic numerals converter it will transform it to MCCLVI

Roman numerals

The numeric system used in ancient Rome employs combinations of letters to signify numerical values. The Romans were great traders so they adapted their own system of numbering from the Etruscan numerals system and started using it for counting.

From the 14th century this system has been replaced with the more convenient Arabic numerals, which we use nowadays.

The Roman numeral letters:

■ Here are the values of each letter: I = 1, V = 5, X = 10, L = 50, C = 100, D = 500, M = 1000;

■ Note that there was no number smaller than one.

■ The concept of zero and negative numbers did not exist.

■ The values over 1000 can be written either by multiplying Ms, for example: 3000= MMM or by putting a bar over the letter, bar that indicates that the value of the letter should be multiplied by 1000. For example a bar over M means 1,000,000. But this usage is no longer current, because the largest numbers usually expressed in the Roman system are dates, as discussed above so you will not really meet a number greater than MMMCMXCIX which is 3999.

The Roman principles, rules:

■ letters need to be arranged from the largest to the smallest value, each value will be added to the previous ones ( 155= CLV not VLC or other combinations);

■ only powers of ten: I, X, C, M; can be repeated;

■ do not repeat any letter more than three times in a row ( 44 = XLIV not XLIIII;

■ symbols V, L and D cannot appear more than once consecutively;

■ in case that a letter representing a smaller value precedes one with a larger value, the value of the smaller one is subtracted from the larger and the result is added to the rest of the letters;

■ only powers of ten (I, X, C, M) can be subtracted.

Roman numerals chart:

Arabic Roman Arabic Roman Arabic Roman
1 I 21 XXI 41 XLI
2 II 22 XXII 42 XLII
3 III 23 XXIII 43 XLIII
4 IV 24 XXIV 44 XLIV
5 V 25 XXV 45 XLV
6 VI 26 XXVI 46 XLVI
7 VII 27 XXVII 47 XLVII
8 VIII 28 XXVIII 48 XLVIII
9 IX 29 XXIX 49 XLIX
10 X 30 XXX 50 L
11 XI 31 XXXI 60 LX
12 XII 32 XXXII 70 LXX
13 XIII 33 XXXIII 80 LXXX
14 XIV 34 XXXIV 90 XC
15 XV 35 XXXV 100 C
16 XVI 36 XXXVI 200 CC
17 XVII 37 XXXVII 300 CCC
18 XVIII 38 XXXVIII 400 CD
19 XIX 39 XXXIX 500 D
20 XX 40 XL 1000 M

Modern usage:

Though the extended use was replaced with the Arabic numerals, a much simple system, the Roman numerals are still in use in various fields because of their classic style and elegance.

We most common find them as list item indicators, time pieces or on antiquities. Names of monarchs and rulers are most likely to contain roman numerals that show order.

Publishing industry uses them for copyright dates, chapter and ad notations on books. Watch manufacturers use them on their products for a touch of class. Last but not least, Roman numerals are used to indicate occurrences of a recurring grand event.

22 Dec, 2014 | 0 comments

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